Environment Out of the Box thinking could change how we treat jellyfish stings

Out of the Box thinking could change how we treat jellyfish stings

A collection of professors and doctors from James Cook Uni and Cairns hospital have published a paper investigating the effect of vinegar on ‘nemotocysts’, or small stinging darts, released by the box jellyfish when it stings a victim.

The study found that applying vinegar directly after a sting may in fact serve to promote the release of more toxins, thereby increasing the deadly effect of the sting.

Given that the Australian Resuscitation Council’s (ARC) protocol advises that vinegar be used in the treatment of all stings, the study presents a compelling reason to rethink things. After all, box jellyfish stings, although rare, can very quickly become deadly.

The study, which was funded by the Queensland Emergency Medicine Research Foundation, confirms the need to support research into emergency medicine.

[img source] K. Dooley (CCA.2.0) bit.ly/Tmqfkt