Lifestyle ‘Gimmick’ date weddings more likely to end in divorce: study

‘Gimmick’ date weddings more likely to end in divorce: study

Weddings held on Valentine’s Day or special-number dates like 9/9/99 or 1/2/03 are 18 to 36 percent more likely to end in divorce than weddings on ordinary dates, a study by University of Melbourne economists has found.

The Melbourne Institute report, “Not Your Lucky Day: Romantically and Numerically Special Wedding Date Divorce Risks,” finds that these are incredibly popular wedding dates, with up to five times as many weddings than on comparable ordinary dates.

Previous research has considered many factors that raise the risks of divorce, but report authors Dr Jan Kabátek and Professor David Ribar said that their study into wedding dates was the first of its kind in the world.

By their fifth anniversaries, eleven percent of Valentine’s Day marriages, ten percent of same-number-date marriages and eight percent of ordinary-date marriages were estimated to fail.

By their ninth anniversaries, 21 percent of Valentine’s Day marriages, 19 percent of same-number-date marriages and 16 percent of ordinary-date marriages were estimated to fail.

Differences in the characteristics of couples who married on special dates explained some of these higher risks.

“People who got married on special dates were more likely to have been married before and more likely to have children already,” said Professor Ribar.

“We also found that spouses who married on special dates were less alike, in terms of education and ages, than spouses who married on ordinary dates,” said Dr Kabátek, a member of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course.

Read more about the research findings here. [Story credit: University of Melbourne newsroom]

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