Health Melb Uni physicists give breath of life to critically-ill children in developing countries

Melb Uni physicists give breath of life to critically-ill children in developing countries

A team of physicists at the University of Melbourne are hoping to significantly reduce the number of pneumonia deaths in developing countries with their green energy-powered oxygen machine.

In these countries, electricity shortages are the biggest problem when treating young pneumonia patients. When electricity fails, the flow of oxygen stops in basic machines. Without the support of a steady flow of purified oxygen, pneumonia becomes fatal for young sufferers.

The oxygen machine developed by University of Melbourne physicists, known as LPOS, stores oxygen at low-pressure and runs a steady supply of oxygen on renewable energy during a blackout. “[The machine will work] for periods up to eight or 10 hours whilst there may be no power, just using renewable energy at that point.”

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has provided $100,000 to develop the machine, with the possibility of contributing $1 million if it is proven to work. The machine will be put to the test in clinics in Uganda in August.

[img source] The University of Melbourne
The above story is based on materials provided by The University of Melbourne