Health UQ researcher’s talking book ensures indigenous languages have longevity

UQ researcher’s talking book ensures indigenous languages have longevity

Dr Felicity Meakins, from the University of Queensland, has worked with elders from the Gurindji community to develop a book that will keep indigenous languages alive for future generations.

The book links text to audio via QR codes that can be scanned and played via smartphone. Most indigenous languages were traditionally only spoken, not written, so Dr Meakins’ work enables readers to hear the translation as it would be spoken.

This is a great application of existing technology to preserve the Gurindji language and bring new life to the history and culture of the Gurindji people. “It means that Gurindji elders will continue to be heard long after they pass away, and younger generations will still have access to their knowledge,” said Dr Meakins. Thanks for keeping Australia clever, UQ. Fantastic work.

1-talkingbookg
[img] The Kawarla book team: (L-R) Felicity Meakins (linguist), Penny Smith (photographer), Violet Wadrill, Biddy and Jimmy Wavehill (Gurindji language experts, painters and coolamon makers).

[img source] The University of Queensland
The above story is based on materials provided by The University of Queensland