Technology ANU could revolutionise fast and secure data storage with quantum hard drive breakthrough

ANU could revolutionise fast and secure data storage with quantum hard drive breakthrough

Physicists from the Australian National University are developing a prototype hard drive capable of storing quantum information 100 times longer than previous methods.

The prototype takes advantage of the complex process of quantum mechanics, whereby pairs of particles such as photons can interact, no matter how far away from each other they are. The process allows for the rapid and secure encryption and transfer of information between the two particles.

The trouble is, the transfer of information by quantum means is normally limited by the fragile and extremely short-lived connections between particles.

The new hard drive extends the time that quantum data can be retained to six hours, or about 100 times the previous record. This makes quantum storage not just rapid and incredibly secure, but stable too.

The technology could have massive implications for the transfer of all kinds of data, from banking information to personal emails. It allows for information to be transferred over much larger distances, without the unreliability or cost of current methods.Australians make up less than 0.3% of the world’s population but we account for over 3% of the world’s scientific research output.

Australians make up less than 0.3% of the world’s population but we account for over 3% of the world’s scientific research output. Thank you, ANU, for leading in Australia’s scientific breakthroughs.

anu.edu.au2
Manjin Zhong in the Solid State Spectroscopy lab at RSPE

Original article at Australian National University
Full research on Nature | international journal on science

[img source] Australian National University