Technology Curtin Uni are digitally recreating Australia’s worst naval disaster to help preserve our history

Curtin Uni are digitally recreating Australia’s worst naval disaster to help preserve our history

On November 19, 1941, light cruiser HMAS Sydney II and the German raider HSK Kormoran engaged in a maritime battle which resulted in the loss of 645 Australian lives. The wrecks were discovered by the Finding Sydney Foundation off the coast of Shark Bay in WA in 2008.

Now, a team from Curtin University, led by Dr Andrew Hutchison (School of Design and Art), Andrew Woods (Centre for Marine Science and Technology) and Dr Petra Helmholz (Department of Spatial Sciences) are setting out to digitally recreate the site of the wreck using all available images and video from the 2008 expedition as well as their own underwater findings. With 2014 technology, the team is able to take photos 2.5km underwater in the dark!

The project is dealing with a huge amount of data, with hundreds of thousands of still images needed for the 3D reconstruction, as well as issues with angles, lighting, and the speed and control of the remotely operated camera equipment.

Despite the issues, the project is set to recreate one of the most important moments in our history, and turn it into an immersive, interactive history exhibit.

Now that’s pretty clever.

Josh Hollick, Visualisation Specialist at the HIVE@Curtin University, demonstrates Curtin’s 180-degree immersive cylinder. The images on screen are 3D reconstructions of various real-world objects, including the 120 metre long HMAS ANZAC ship – an experiment to develop the techniques required to reconstruct the HMAS Sydney and HSK Kormoran at 2500 meters deep in the Indian Ocean.

[img source] Curtin University
[original article] at Curtin University’s website