Technology Monash Uni research into chipless tracking could see an end to the traditional barcode

Monash Uni research into chipless tracking could see an end to the traditional barcode

A research team lead by Dr Nemai Karmakar, from the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering at Monash University, has developed a new kind of printable RFID tags for use on metals and packages containing liquid.

The reflective properties of metal cans and water bottles had previously made printing RFID tags impossible on these surfaces, but the new chipless tags can be printed with an inkjet printer directly onto these surfaces. This makes them more reliable, smaller and cheaper than traditional barcodes.

Because the tags are printed at very high resolution, things like printing errors and variations in a product’s surface have little effect on whether or not the tag can be read effectively. They also very resistant to both high and low temperatures.

Clever innovations such as these keep Australia clever.

[img source] Mitchell J. (CCA2.0)
The above story is based on materials provided by Monash University